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General Questions About Wisdom Panel Questions

What is Wisdom Panel?

Knowing your dog’s ancestry can help you create a tailored wellness programme to fit their one-of-a-kind needs. Wisdom Panel is a simple DNA test that helps reveal the breeds in your dog’s ancestry. The test incorporates the ancestry analysis, as well as, the purebred and designer dog (first generation cross between two purebred dogs) so you can answer a number of different questions with one simple kit.
 
If you think your dog is a mixed-breed, Wisdom Panel will analyse the DNA data using our computer program and breed database to identify the breed(s) present in their recent ancestry. If you think your dog is one or two specific breeds, you can indicate these during kit activation. The DNA sample will be analysed with the breed identification computer program, as well as, examine the specific breed(s) you indicated to determine how closely your dog’s DNA profile matches.
 
In the case of a mixed-breed dog, your dog has inherited traits from his ancestors just like you did from your family. But, just like you don’t look exactly like your grandparents, the same is true for your loveable mutt. When you combine the DNA from different purebreds, you create a one-of-a-kind mixed-breed dog like yours. As it can be difficult to identify ancestral breeds by visual identification, using your dog’s DNA to determine the ancestral breeds is much more accurate.
 

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How does the Wisdom Panel report show a mixed-breed dog's results?

Wisdom Panel breaks down a dog’s lineage in the form of an ancestry tree and pie chart so you can see percentages. This allows you to see which breeds are present at a parent, grandparent, and great-grandparent level. Keep in mind that a parent contributes 50% of their DNA to the puppy while a grandparent contributes about 25% and great-grandparent approximately 12.5%.
 
Since each of these levels can contribute different amounts of DNA to the puppy, there are a variety of influences in the puppy’s physical and behavioural traits. With a parental breed, you are likely to see some physical and behavioural traits from this breed represented unless some of the genes are recessive (requires two copies of the gene variant to show it). Examples of recessive traits include longhair (in most breeds), a clear yellow or red hair coat, a brown or chocolate hair coat, and "prick" or upright ear set (e.g. like a German Shepherd Dog). You may see traits from breeds at the grandparent level and it becomes even less likely to see physical and behavioural traits from breeds at the great-grandparent level unless those traits are dominant (requires only one copy of the gene variant to show it). Examples of dominant traits include shorthair (in most breeds), black hair coat, black nose, a "drop" or down ear set (e.g. like a Beagle), and merle/dapple (e.g. like a Australian Shepherd or Great Dane).
 
Not only does the computer analyse a dog’s DNA for the breeds and their likely proportions in the dog’s ancestry, but it also models which side of the dog’s ancestry each breed is likely coming from. You can see a sample report here.
 

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How does Wisdom Panel work?

Testing your dog with Wisdom Panel begins when you use the cheek swabs to collect a DNA sample from inside your dog’s cheek and then send the swabs into the laboratory. Once your sample is received at our lab it is scanned into our database and assigned to a batch for testing. It then undergoes processing to extract the DNA from your dog’s cells which is examined for the 1800+ markers that are used in the test. The results of these markers are sent to a computer that evaluates them using a program designed to consider all of the pedigree trees that are possible in the last three generations. The trees considered include a simple pedigree with a single breed (a likely pure-bred dog), all the way up to a complex tree with eight different great-grandparent breeds allowed. Our computer uses information from our extensive breed database to fill these potential pedigrees.
 
For each of the millions of combinations of ancestry trees built and considered, the computer gives each a score representing how well that selected combination of breeds matched to your dog’s data. The pedigree with the overall best score is selected and provided to you in your dog’s individualised report. It normally takes 2-3 weeks from the time a sample is received for the genetic testing and analysis to be completed.
 

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How do I use my Wisdom Panel kit to test my dog’s DNA?

Testing is as easy as 1-2-3.
 
  1. Simply collect a sample from the inside of your dog’s cheek with the included swabs.
  2. Using the provided "Test Sample ID", activate your kit online and mail the swabs back to our laboratory in the postage-paid envelope.
  3. Within about 3 weeks, you’ll receive a link to visit your dog's customized ancestry report online.
 

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Where do I find the Sample ID # to check the status of my order?

Depending on your kit, the Sample ID# should be located on the top or bottom of your submission form or instruction sheet and is a 7 or 10-digit code.
 

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How can I track my Wisdom Panel sample online?

You can track the progress of your sample online by visiting our test status checker and loggin in with the account credentials you set up when you activated your kit. We begin tracking your sample once it reaches the lab.
 
 

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Can Wisdom Panel certify a purebred or designer dog?

If you think your dog is a purebred or a cross between two different purebreds, sometimes referred to as a designer dog, you can indicate this during kit activation and the DNA sample will be analyzed as usual against all the breeds in our database with the breed identification computer program. By distinguishing a particular breed or breeds at activation, however, we will also perform additional analyses that compare how closely your dog’s DNA profile matches to the specific breed(s) in our database, that you identified. Note that the DNA profiles for some breeds may vary depending on the family line or specific geographic origin of that family line. For example, we have observed different DNA patterns for some purebred dogs in the US and the UK or Australia.
ralia. 
 

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Has Wisdom Panel been used to test the same dog more than once to see if results are the same?

Yes, we have used Wisdom Panel to test many dogs more than once and we were able to detect when a second sample from the same dog is submitted. Our quality control work demonstrates that on each of the 1800+ genetic markers analysed with the Wisdom Panel, the average repeatability is over 99%. Due to subtle differences between run variations in the number of markers that are returned from our laboratory, there may, occasionally, be minor variation in the results reported, particularly at the trace amount level, though most breeds will be detected in common between repeat runs of the same sample.
 

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How accurate is Wisdom Panel?

 
At Mars Veterinary, we pride ourselves on offering the most reliable and accurate genetic tests on the market. Wisdom Panel tests provide the highest level of accuracy possible for a cheek swab DNA test, but that accuracy can vary depending on the quality of DNA collected from the dog. Because of the potential variation in DNA quality, we are unable to provide a definitive determination of accuracy at this time.
 
To ensure that the Wisdom Panel tests are as accurate as possible, Mars Veterinary has focused its research on several important factors including:
  1. Genetic markers: These are the places of variation in a dog's DNA. By studying both the similarities and differences in these markers among different breeds, we are able to determine characteristic signatures. During Wisdom Panel test development we completed over 19 million genetic marker analyses and typed over 13,000 dogs. This is important because careful analysis is needed in order to accurately locate the sites of variation that make each breed unique. All of these calculations require a very advanced computer program that can analyze all of this data and identify the breeds in each dog. Today we use 1800 markers for testing.
  2. Numbers and types of dogs: Our database is used to compare your dog's DNA against other dog’s DNA. The more breeds, the better the test. Wisdom Panel 2.0 and 2.5 tests cover over 200 different breeds, types, and varieties and Wisdom Panel 3.0 and 4.0 cover 250+ breeds, types, and varieties.
  3. Validation testing for accuracy: This includes repeated testing of a dog’s sample and review by independent third party specialists, geneticists, and leading authorities on canine genetics. All of the Wisdom Panel tests are run in an USDA-accredited laboratory to ensure proper quality control.
 

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Can Wisdom Panel 2.0 identify health issues or disease predispositions?

Wisdom Panel 2.0 can determine the breed makeup of a dog. It is not designed to determine which disease traits—if any—might be present in a dog. The real value in this test is that with knowledge of your dog’s breed ancestry, you can work together with your veterinarian to develop a more targeted care plan for your dog and have a better understanding of their dog’s physical and behavioural traits. This one-time investment helps owners feel confident they are providing their dog with the best care possible.
 

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How long does it take to get my results?

Once the sample has been received at the lab it generally takes two to three weeks for the sample to be tested, the results generated, and the report made available for viewing. You will receive an email notification when your report is ready.
 

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Why doesn't my dog look like the breeds detected by the Wisdom Panel test?

Physical appearance is largely controlled by a small number of genes. These genes can have both recessive and dominant variants and the particular variants that are present in the dog determine the physical traits seen. As a result, the presence of a breed’s signature does not guarantee that the dog will look like the specific detected breed, because the genetic contributions from the other breeds present may be more visible.

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Can puppies be tested with Wisdom Panel?

Yes. Wisdom Panel is designed for dogs of all ages and is safe and easy to use at any stage in a dog's life. However, we do recommend waiting until a puppy has been weaned to prevent cross-contamination from suckling on their mother and having cells from her skin and milk in their mouth at the time of swabbing.
 
Note that it can be very difficult to observe breed traits in puppies, because they are growing and developing rapidly. Most dogs will not achieve their final mature physical traits until they are at least one to two years of age.
 

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What if I have a question about my test results?

Please contact us via email at: customercare@marsveterinary.co.uk or via the contact us form, if you should have any questions regarding your results.
 

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Do the Wisdom Panel test results denote which parent is the mother and which is the father?

Wisdom Panel is not able to determine which parent is the mother and which is the father at this time.
 

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Will the Wisdom Panel test results allow me to register my dog with The Kennel Club?

The Wisdom Panel tests do not allow you to register your dog with The Kennel Club. For information on how to register your dog with The Kennel Club please visit: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/registration/
 

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Does Wisdom Panel measure the purity of my purebred dog?

The Wisdom Panel test can be used to compare your dog genetically to known purebreds in a pre-specified breed to see how similar or dissimilar your dog is to members of that particular breed. However, the kennel clubs govern the definition of purity.
 

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Does Wisdom Panel provide proof of parentage?

Wisdom Panel does not provide parentage testing at this time.
 

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Can Wisdom Panel determine the sex of the dog tested?

Wisdom Panel is specifically designed to look for the combination of ancestral breed(s) in a dog utilising the non-sex chromosomes, and therefore, it cannot determine the sex of a dog at this time.
 

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Is Mars Veterinary collecting samples of purebred dogs to add more breeds to the Wisdom Panel tests?

Yes. If you have a purebred dog that is not part of the over 185 breeds that we currently cover, and would like to donate a small sample to help us add that breed to our database, please contact our customer care team at customercare@marsveterinary.co.uk. We will send an information pack to enable you to send us a sample.

 

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Where did Mars Veterinary get the dog DNA samples used to develop the Wisdom Panel tests and scientific studies?

The development of the Wisdom Panel test included the analysis of more than 19 million DNA markers across more than 13,000 dogs. As a result, Wisdom Panel can identify over 185 breeds and varieties that may be present in a dog including the majority of breeds registered with The Kennel Club at this time. The Wisdom Panel tests are based on the most sophisticated and comprehensive genetic database for dogs available.
 

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Questions About DNA Sample Collection Questions

How do I collect a good DNA sample from my dog’s cheek?

Collecting a sample is easy.
 
1. Quickly inspect your dog’s mouth between the cheek and gums for food debris.
2. Peel back the edges of the swab and avoid touching the bristles.
3. Firmly roll and rotate swab bristles against the inside of your dog’s cheek.
4. Allow sample to dry five minutes prior to putting the swab back into sleeve.
 
 

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How long after my dog has eaten and/or drank can I swab them?

Please wait approximately two hours after a meal or treat (drinking water is fine) to begin the DNA collection.
 

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How do I air dry the swab without contaminating it?

The swab will only become contaminated if it comes into contact with other dogs, people, or dirty surfaces. It should be dried while the swab bristles are in the air and not in contact with any surface. Both swabs should be air dried for five minutes and the reinserted into the protective sleeves provided so that the bristle brushes are completely covered. Very important! Do not reseal the sleeve as this can cause bacteria/fungus growth. Your dog’s swab samples should be shipped immediately and they can be shipped at normal room temperature. Please follow the instructions in your kit to mail the swabs in their pre-paid packaging.
 

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How long can I leave the swabs out before they become unusable?

The swabs should be placed back in their protective sleeves as soon as they have air dried. Both swabs only need five minutes to completely dry. Leaving them out in the air for longer than the recommended time should not damage the swabs, but may increase the possibility of contamination. Please keep in mind that the protective sleeves should not be resealed as this may cause bacteria/fungus growth to occur.
 

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How will I know if I have enough DNA on my swab?

Cheek cells will not necessarily be visible on the swabs. However, if you place the swab inside the dog’s cheek and firmly rub the swab around for about 15 seconds then there should be enough material transferred to the swab.
 

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How do I activate my dog’s sample?

Activate your dog’s sample at Activate Your Kit. This will allow immediate tracking of your sample as well as updates throughout the process of the test analysis. Please be sure to complete all the required fields. You will need your sample ID found on your instruction sheet.
 

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Where do I find the Sample ID # to activate my sample online?

Depending on your kit, the sample ID# should be located on the top or bottom of your submission form or instruction sheet. It is a seven or ten-digit code.
 

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What if I have more than one dog in my home?

To ensure that a good swab sample is obtained it is best that your dog does not share water or food bowls with another dog for at least two hours prior to swabbing them.
 

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My dog destroyed one of the swabs, are both needed for the test?

Ideally, we would like to have both swabs in case there is not enough DNA material on one swab for us to test; however, only one swab is necessary to perform the analysis. If that swab fails the analysis, Mars Veterinary will contact you for a retest with an additional swab kit.
 

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My dog just died can I still do a Wisdom Panel test?

Taking a swab DNA sample from a deceased dog is not recommended, whatever the circumstance, as the quality of the DNA sample will likely be unusable for Wisdom Panel testing purposes.
 

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Questions About Breeds Questions

Which breeds are detected by the Wisdom Panel tests?

The Wisdom Panel database covers over 185 different breeds. For a full list of breed detected, visit our Breeds Detected page. 
 

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Does Wisdom Panel test for wolf or coyote?

The Wisdom Panel tests were developed using genetic markers specific for the dog. These tests are not intended to test for wolf or coyote DNA.
 

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Can regulatory/animal control officials use the Wisdom Panel® to determine whether breeds are legislated or banned in a particular community?

Wisdom Panel® is designed and intended to be used solely to identify the breed history of a dog and no other purpose is authorised or permitted.
 
Wisdom Panel® is not intended to predict behaviour in any particular dog. Each dog is unique and its physical and behavioural traits will be the result of multiple factors, including: genetics, training, handling and environment.
 

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Science Based Questions Questions

Scientifically, how did we get to the point to where we can identify the breed makeup of a dog?

The Wisdom Panel® tests are the result of years of extensive research and draws on the expertise of scientists at the internationally respected Waltham® Centre for Pet Nutrition in the United Kingdom, along with leading veterinarians, universities and breed organisations throughout the world.
 
The Wisdom Panel® tests are based on three main factors:
 
1 – Genetic markers: These are the places of variation in a dog's genetic structure. By studying both the similarities and differences in these markers amongst different breeds, we are able to determine characteristic signatures. During Wisdom Panel® test development we completed over 19 million genetic marker analyses and typed over 13,000 dogs during test development. This is important because careful studies are needed in order to properly find the places of variation that make each breed unique. All of these calculations require a very advanced computer program that can analyse all of this data and identify the breeds in each dog.
 
2 – Numbers and types of dogs: This is the database we refer to that is used to compare your dog's DNA against other breeds. The more breeds, the better the test. Wisdom Panel® 2.0 tests for over 185 different breeds and varieties.
 
3 – Validation testing for accuracy: This includes repeated testing of a dog’s sample and review by independent third party specialists, geneticists, and leading authorities on canine genetics. In each stage of testing your dog's DNA, the Wisdom Panel® tests are run in a USDA accredited laboratory to ensure proper quality control.
 

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What happens to my dog's sample at the laboratory?

Once your sample is received at our lab it is scanned into our database and assigned to a batch for testing. It then undergoes processing to extract the DNA from your dog’s cells which is examined for the 1800+ markers that are used in the test. The results of these markers are sent to a computer that evaluates them using a program designed to consider all of the pedigree trees that are possible in the last three generations. The trees considered include a simple pedigree with a single breed (a likely pure-bred dog), all the way up to a complex tree with eight different great-grandparent breeds allowed. Our computer uses information from our extensive breed database to fill these potential pedigrees.
 
For each of the millions of combinations of ancestry trees built and considered, the computer gives each a score representing how well that selected combination of breeds matched to your dog’s data. The pedigree with the overall best score is selected and provided to you in your dog’s individualised report. It normally takes 2-3 weeks from the time a sample is received for the genetic testing and analysis to be completed. For a detailed explanation on how your dog's test sample is analyzed, watch this informative video: From Mailbox to Inbox – The Journey of Fido’s DNA
 

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Why can it take so long to process my dog's sample?

The Wisdom Panel® is one of the most advanced genetic analyses commercially available at this time. The full process to extract the DNA, identify your dog’s DNA markers, and analyse the results against the extensive Wisdom Panel® breed database is done in a very deliberate and careful manner that normally takes up to 2-3 weeks from the time a sample is received to be completed. For a detailed explanation on how your dog's test sample is analysed, watch this informative video: From Mailbox to Inbox – The Journey of Fido’s DNA

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Is the Wisdom Panel breed detection analysis at all similar to the kind of DNA analysis people can undergo to find out their ancestry? Does mitochondrial DNA or Y-chromosome DNA come into play in the analysis? How are the 1800+ genetic markers determined?

Wisdom Panel has some technological similarities to the DNA analysis that people use to determine their ancestry, but there are major differences in what each analysis is looking for. Wisdom Panel tests are designed to detect the presence of purebred dogs in the most recent ancestry of a dog going back about three generations to the great-grandparent level. In contrast, most human ancestry tests are designed to detect the proportion of the tested individual that comes from historical, racial, or defined population groups many generations ago.
 
Wisdom Panel only uses what are called autosomal DNA markers, chromosomes that contain most of the genetic instructions for every canine’s body make up (height, weight, size etc.). There are no markers from either of the so-called sex chromosomes (the canine X or Y chromosomes). Mitochondrial DNA, or Y-chromosome DNA testing, is rather different as these parts of the genome are passed on intact from mother to child and father to son respectively, but are therefore only representative of either the female or the male lineage. Autosomal DNA is inherited both from the maternal and paternal lineages equally. It is constantly shuffled by a process called recombination at each successive generation, and therefore it is able to provide more useful information on the breeds found on both sides of a dog’s lineage.
 
To find the genetic markers that performed best at distinguishing between breeds, Mars Veterinary tested over 4,600 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms or genetic markers, where genetic variation has been found between different dogs), from positions across the entire canine autosomal genome from over 3,200 dogs. To further refine the search, Mars Veterinary determined the best 1,536 genetic variations and ran them against an additional 4,400 dogs from a wide range of breeds. This stage of testing resulted in the selection of a final panel of DNA markers that performed best at distinguishing between breeds, ultimately creating the Wisdom Panel genetic database. This database presently covers over 185 total breeds, types, and varieties. For a full list of breeds covered by test type visit our Breeds Detected Page.

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Do breed signatures differ from commonly understood notions of recessive and dominant genes? That is, it seems that the presence of a breed signature doesn't necessarily imply a physical appearance?

Physical appearance (predominantly determined by genes that influence the development of canine size and body mass, coat length, type and colour, skull shape, leg length, ear and tail types), is known to be controlled by a very small number of genes relative to the overall number of genes contained in the canine genome (~20,000 or so in total). These genes can have both recessive and dominant variants and the variant(s) present determines the visible effect on physical traits seen. The presence of breed signatures does not guarantee that the dog will look like all detected breeds.
 
The Wisdom Panel breed signatures are defined by markers that are consistent with the presence of a particular breed in the background of a tested dog, but were not chosen to specifically cover the genes responsible for specific trait determination from those breeds—many parts of the genome are likely to be unobservable with regard to trait determination. This can happen for any number of trait-determining genes. Therefore, a mixed-breed dog could be a mix of three or four breeds but have few traits evident from one or more of these breeds. There are two good examples of how this can happen. The first is eye colour in humans.
 
Brown is dominant over blue and green, and yet, a brown-eyed mother can have a green-eyed son if the dominant brown eye colour variant is not passed on. The second, and perhaps best, illustration of the surprising affects you may see when mixing breeds is to study some designer dogs (e.g. puggles, cockapoos, labradoodles, etc.)—a custom combination of two different pure breeds. Often these dogs will look quite different to the founder breeds because they are a mixture of two very different sets of genetic backgrounds. Equally many dog breeds still contain a variety of genetic variants for specific trait genes, especially coat colour, size and coat type. For example, there are many different forms of Schnauzers such as miniature, standard and giant, and there are many different coat colours and coat types found in the Dachshund breed such as wire, smooth, and long-haired. Dogs can be many different colours and yet are still classified as the same breed.
 

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I don’t think my dog looks like the breeds detected in the Wisdom Panel analysis. Can you help me understand this?

Many parts of the canine genome are likely to be unobservable or hidden with regard to trait determination. This can happen for any number of trait-determining genes. Simply put, a mixed-breed dog could be a mix of 3 or 4 breeds but have few traits evident from one or more of these breeds. There are two good examples of how this can happen. The first is eye colour in humans.
 
Brown is dominant over blue and green, and yet, a brown-eyed mother can have a green-eyed son if the dominant brown eye colour variant is not passed on. The second, and perhaps best, illustration of the surprising affects you may see when mixing breeds is to study some designer dogs (e.g. puggles, cockapoos, labradoodles, etc.)—a custom combination of two different pure breeds. Often these dogs will look quite different to the founder breeds because they are a mixture of two very different sets of genetic backgrounds. Equally many dog breeds still contain a variety of genetic variants for specific trait genes, especially coat colour, size and coat type. For example, there are many different forms of Schnauzers such as miniature, standard and giant, and there are many different coat colours and coat types found in the Dachshund breed such as wire, smooth, and long-haired. Dogs can be many different colours and yet are still classified as the same breed.
 

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How does Wisdom Panel analyse a dog’s DNA data to make a final breed determination?

All breed determinations are made by our proprietary computer algorithm. With each tested dog’s DNA, more than 18 million repetitive comparisons are made using a complex statistical algorithm. This algorithm scans the 1800+ genetic markers collected and looks for matches to breed signatures. It provides a marker by marker certainty score for each breed match. The computer then selects the single best combination of breeds and relative amounts of breeds detected that best match the tested DNA sample from this comparison with our extensive database of purebred signatures.
 

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Many dog breeds are derived from other, older breeds. Could Wisdom Panel sometimes mistakenly detect some of the originating breeds instead of the newer Kennel Club-recognised breed?

Some breeds are relatively new; created from mixing other breeds together within the last few decades. When this happens, some ancestral similarities may remain in certain chromosomal regions. This makes it possible to have breeds that have been combined and ultimately formed a new breed to potentially be detected as matches at certain markers in the Wisdom Panel. If this occurs, this would most likely be reported as trace amounts of the ancestrally related breeds.
 

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Certain breeds have their ears cropped, tails docked, and their dew claws removed. Although this is a breed standard, why do your test results not show the both the breed standard and the un-docked/cropped/etc. version to help owners better understand the make-up of their pet?

Mars Veterinary follows the guidelines of the American Kennel Club (AKC) in its breed identification. As such, the AKC recognises that ear cropping, tail docking, and dewclaw removal, as described in certain breed standards, are acceptable practices integral to defining and preserving breed character and/or enhancing good health. This is why we have chosen to represent dogs in this way in our test results report. We recognise that dogs have many differentiating features. Our intent is to capture the most readily recognised and widely understood attributes in our results reporting. We encourage pet owners to submit photos of their dogs to our Dog Park to illustrate the interesting variations to the standard. You can find the full list of dogs that are cropped, docked or declawed on the AKC website, www.akc.org.
 

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What would happen if a dog has a breed not presently covered by the Wisdom Panel database?

The Wisdom Panel test is designed to find the best matches to over 185 breeds in our database including most Kennel Club-recognised breeds. Occasionally there may be a breed that is not presently covered by the Wisdom Panel database in which case, the results will depend upon the genetic relatedness of the tested dog to the breeds available in our database. For example, a Llewellyn Setter (closely related genetically to the English Setter but not covered by the Wisdom Panel) might result in a report that contains some amount of English Setter.

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About Mars Veterinary, Mars, Incorporated and WALTHAM® Questions

Who is Mars Veterinary?

Mars Veterinary is a business unit of Mars Petcare. Our mission is facilitating responsible pet care by enhancing the well-being and relationship between pets, pet owners, and veterinarians through valuable insights into pets as individuals.

For nearly a decade, Mars Veterinary has researched and developed state-of-the-art genetic tests for purebred, designer and mixed-breed dogs, revolutionizing personalized pet care. By discovering a dog's ancestry, pet owners and veterinarians can work together to tailor wellness programs that fit the one-of-a-kind needs of the owner’s unique dog. To learn more check out our About Us page.
 
 

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Why is Mars, Incorporated involved in canine genetics?

Mars, Incorporated, a company known for innovative consumer and pet food and care brands that are trusted by people around the world, has been deeply involved with canine genetics for many years. As the largest pet care providers in the world, Mars, Incorporated has consistently provided innovation in products that meet the needs of pets and owners.
 

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When were the Wisdom Panel canine DNA tests launched?

The first Mars Veterinary canine DNA test was launched in 2007 in the U.S. under the name Wisdom Panel MX, a blood-based test administered by veterinarians that helped determine a dog’s recent breed ancestry. Additional genetic disease screens were added to the test and launched in the U.S.veterinary market as Wisdom Panel Professional in 2009.  Our first cheek swab-based test called Wisdom Panel Insights was brought to the consumer market that year as well.
 
In 2011, the researchers at Mars Veterinary developed additional tools to answer specific questions about purebred and first-generation crossbred dogs which were included in Wisdom Panel Purebred and Wisdom Panel Designer Dog. In 2013 Wisdom Panel 2.0 was launched in the U.S. and the U.K. which combined all the aspects of our mixed and purebred tests into a single, convenient test.
 

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What is the relationship between Mars Veterinary and WALTHAM®?

Mars Veterinary draws on work carried out at the Waltham® Centre for Pet Nutrition, the world’s leading authority on pet care and nutrition, as well as the expertise of respected veterinarians, universities and breed organisations throughout the world.
 
Located in rural Leicestershire, England, the renowned Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition has been a leading scientific authority in pet nutrition and well-being, advancing the frontiers of humane scientific research into the nutrition and healthy longevity of companion animals for over 30 years.
 
Their state-of-the art research programme focuses on the nutritional and behavioral needs of companion animals and develops products which meet these needs in a practical way. It is Waltham that provides the science behind world-leading Mars pet care companies. Waltham has a leading reputation amongst pet owners, breeders, veterinarians and academics alike.
 

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